The Case for Christ

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Basically, each chapter goes like this:
 
Basically, each chapter goes like this:
  
1) Insert an anecdote about modern criminal cases and how they were solved by a piece of evidence
+
# Insert an anecdote about modern criminal cases and how they were solved by a piece of evidence
2) Introduce somebody to serve as the Christian apologetic
+
# Introduce somebody to serve as the Christian apologetic
3) Describe every facet of their education and work history (a classic appeal to authority in hopes the reader will trust the validity of the next few pages)
+
# Describe every facet of their education and work history (a classic appeal to authority in hopes the reader will trust the validity of the next few pages)
4) Strobel plays devil's advocate and asks the person "tough questions" posed by skeptics
+
# Strobel plays devil's advocate and asks the person "tough questions" posed by skeptics
5) Strobel accepts weak argument
+
# Strobel accepts weak argument
6) Strobel asks personal questions about the subject's religious convictions (i.e. "How much do you love Jesus now?" "A lot!")
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# Strobel asks personal questions about the subject's religious convictions (i.e. "How much do you love Jesus now?" "A lot!")
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==

Revision as of 17:46, 16 November 2008


The Case for Christ is a popular book on Christian apologetics by Lee Strobel.

Counter-apologetics issues

Although Strobel claimed to be an atheist when he started this book, many readers have pointed out that he did a very bad job supporting the atheist position. Furthermore, he conducted interviews only with Christian apologists, and none with atheists or skeptics. He has claimed that the book is balanced because he himself is arguing against the apologists, but at many points in the book he appears extremely reluctant to challenge his subjects.

Further, if Strobel proved the existence of Christ as a historical fact then there would be no room for "faith". Therefore, he is satisfied to give the reader a "case" as to not negate the importance of faith.

Formula for the book

Basically, each chapter goes like this:

  1. Insert an anecdote about modern criminal cases and how they were solved by a piece of evidence
  2. Introduce somebody to serve as the Christian apologetic
  3. Describe every facet of their education and work history (a classic appeal to authority in hopes the reader will trust the validity of the next few pages)
  4. Strobel plays devil's advocate and asks the person "tough questions" posed by skeptics
  5. Strobel accepts weak argument
  6. Strobel asks personal questions about the subject's religious convictions (i.e. "How much do you love Jesus now?" "A lot!")

External links

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