Testimonium Flavian

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The Testimonium Flavian, or Testimonium Flavianum, is a passage allegedly written by [[Flavius Josephus]] which is often used by Christians to support a [[Existence of Jesus|historical Jesus]]. It appears in section 18.3.3 of Josephus' work ''Antiquities Of The Jews'', and scolars disagree on whether the passage is genuine to Josephus or whether it is a late interpolation by a Christian redactor.
  
The Testimonium Flavian is a passage written by [[Flavius Josephus]] which is often used by Christians to support a [[Existence of Jesus|historical Jesus]].
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The passage as we have it reads:
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Now there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, if it be lawful to call him a man; for he was a doer of wonderful works, a teacher of such men as receive the truth with pleasure. He drew over to him both many of the Jews and many of the Gentiles. He was [the] Christ. And when Pilate, at the suggestion of the principal men amongst us, had condemned him to the cross, those that loved him at the first did not forsake him; for he appeared to them alive again the third day;  as the divine prophets had foretold these and ten thousand other wonderful things concerning him. And the tribe of Christians, so named from him, are not extinct at this day.<ref=http://www.earlyjewishwritings.com/text/josephus/ant18.html>(1)</ref>
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There are three viewpoints taken by scholars on the passage:
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:* The passage, in its entireity, is genuine;
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:* The passage is partly authentic but there have been Christian redactions;
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:* or, the passage is a complete fabrication, possibly made by the fourth century Christian apologist Eusebius.
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Very few scholars take the first option. Passages such as "He was The Christ" would imply thet Josephus was a Christian, when in fact he was Jewish.
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There are, however, many defrnders of the view that the passage is partly authentic. People who support the partial authenicity restructure the passage to get rid of some of the more Christian elements, and come up with:
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Now there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, for he was a doer of wonderful works. He drew over to him both many of the Jews and many of the Gentiles. And when Pilate, at the suggestion of the principal men amongst us, had condemned him to the cross, those that loved him at the first did not forsake him. And the tribe of Christians, so named from him, are not extinct at this day.
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== Arguments For (At Least Partial) Autheticity ==
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The Typically Josephean Language
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Many of the phrases that are used in the Testimonium are typically Josephean.
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Variations on the Original suggest an Authentic Core
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Present In All Manuscripts
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The Testimonium is present in all manuscripts that we have. However, this is not a strong argument for authenticity because
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== Arguments Against Authenticity ==
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Silence on the Passage by Church Fathers
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The passage is not quoted anywhere until we get to the fourth century. Origen, for example, never quotes it, despite the fact he wrote Contra Celsus in much detail, and relies on Josephus in other places in his work.
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The Shortness of The Passage
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The passage is incredibly short for Josephus, and it is a short digression for a characater Josephus thinks is a "wise man". The interpolation view explains this fact: scrolls in the acient world were a limited size, and manuscripts were not written on more scrolls than the original, as this would have made the manuscript difficult for readers to consult.  
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<reference/>

Revision as of 08:19, 15 July 2007

The Testimonium Flavian, or Testimonium Flavianum, is a passage allegedly written by Flavius Josephus which is often used by Christians to support a historical Jesus. It appears in section 18.3.3 of Josephus' work Antiquities Of The Jews, and scolars disagree on whether the passage is genuine to Josephus or whether it is a late interpolation by a Christian redactor.

The passage as we have it reads:

Now there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, if it be lawful to call him a man; for he was a doer of wonderful works, a teacher of such men as receive the truth with pleasure. He drew over to him both many of the Jews and many of the Gentiles. He was [the] Christ. And when Pilate, at the suggestion of the principal men amongst us, had condemned him to the cross, those that loved him at the first did not forsake him; for he appeared to them alive again the third day; as the divine prophets had foretold these and ten thousand other wonderful things concerning him. And the tribe of Christians, so named from him, are not extinct at this day.<ref=http://www.earlyjewishwritings.com/text/josephus/ant18.html>(1)</ref>

There are three viewpoints taken by scholars on the passage:

  • The passage, in its entireity, is genuine;
  • The passage is partly authentic but there have been Christian redactions;
  • or, the passage is a complete fabrication, possibly made by the fourth century Christian apologist Eusebius.

Very few scholars take the first option. Passages such as "He was The Christ" would imply thet Josephus was a Christian, when in fact he was Jewish. There are, however, many defrnders of the view that the passage is partly authentic. People who support the partial authenicity restructure the passage to get rid of some of the more Christian elements, and come up with:

Now there was about this time Jesus, a wise man, for he was a doer of wonderful works. He drew over to him both many of the Jews and many of the Gentiles. And when Pilate, at the suggestion of the principal men amongst us, had condemned him to the cross, those that loved him at the first did not forsake him. And the tribe of Christians, so named from him, are not extinct at this day.

Arguments For (At Least Partial) Autheticity

The Typically Josephean Language

Many of the phrases that are used in the Testimonium are typically Josephean.

Variations on the Original suggest an Authentic Core

Present In All Manuscripts

The Testimonium is present in all manuscripts that we have. However, this is not a strong argument for authenticity because

Arguments Against Authenticity

Silence on the Passage by Church Fathers

The passage is not quoted anywhere until we get to the fourth century. Origen, for example, never quotes it, despite the fact he wrote Contra Celsus in much detail, and relies on Josephus in other places in his work.

The Shortness of The Passage

The passage is incredibly short for Josephus, and it is a short digression for a characater Josephus thinks is a "wise man". The interpolation view explains this fact: scrolls in the acient world were a limited size, and manuscripts were not written on more scrolls than the original, as this would have made the manuscript difficult for readers to consult.

<reference/>

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