Talk:Tides come in, tides go out

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:::::yes, its an application. if it becomes more popular and needs to be accessed easier, it can always be moved back. so if someone wants to move it, thats probably the best thing to do. i would do it, but im not really acquainted with the formatting etc.
 
:::::yes, its an application. if it becomes more popular and needs to be accessed easier, it can always be moved back. so if someone wants to move it, thats probably the best thing to do. i would do it, but im not really acquainted with the formatting etc.
 
:::::--[[User:Conor147|Conor147]] 09:37, 7 March 2011 (CST)
 
:::::--[[User:Conor147|Conor147]] 09:37, 7 March 2011 (CST)
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:I wasn't aware that this page existed until I read it just now.  I agree with the request for deletion.  This is about a one-time incident, not a general apologetic, and the tone is a bit more silly than I'm comfortable with.  I cannot really imagine somebody coming to Iron Chariots and saying "I just heard Bill O'Reilly's tides argument and need a refutation for it."  I propose that anyone who wants to preserve the content here should offload it to another page (Argument from Ignorance was suggested) within a week so I can kill it.  --[[User:Kazim|Kazim]] 14:47, 19 September 2012 (CDT)
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::I had recreated this topic, since there was a red link. I was not aware it had already existed and been deleted, so my apologies for not having checked Talk. I then created "[[Tides come in, tides go out]]" before realizing peasants don't have the ability to delete, so requested this one be deleted. I did all that in order to shorten the title, and because the periods in this titles made it awkward to link. Like I said, I didn't realize it'd already been deleted, so I don't mean to reharsh an old decision, but I would disagree with the points raised. While I agree it's narrow, so too is the "perfect banana". At some point, an argument gains enough notoriety to be a meme, and deserve it's own topic. The same counter-argument applies to people not needing IronChariots to debunk it. It is not a one-time apologetic, since Bill O'Reilly used this multiple times over years. I've never heard anyone else use it, so it may be "single use" as in a single user, but Conor147 has stated that it has been/is used by others. If it is deleted based on being too narrow (again), then "Tides come in, tides go out" needs to also be deleted, and the links leading to it removed. This topic does not have any links to it, as I already redirected them to "Tides come in, tides go out".[[User:John Rogers|John Rogers]] 15:28, 20 November 2013 (CST)

Latest revision as of 08:09, 18 April 2014

An error, and a call for deletion

First of all, the interview was with David Silverman, not Richard Dawkins.

Secondly, this seems like a transient topic, not something of lasting interest. I suggest moving the content of this page to Argument from ignorance. --Arensb 17:23, 4 March 2011 (CST)


no it was with richard dawkins. the david silverman interview was one of the "other encounters" that i mentioned.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FARDDcdFaQ
0:48
and ive been encountering this more and more over the past few years. unless the meme status kills the argument, in which case it would stand as a satirical argument against the god of the gaps (like epilepsy), it will always be relevant.
--Conor147 20:53, 4 March 2011 (CST)
I think the point is that it's not an official apologetic.. just something he came up with off the cuff. It's fine as an example of god-of-the-gaps. This wiki would be huge if we had a separate page for every random comment someone made on the air.
jt 06:18, 5 March 2011 (CST)
i agree its not a unique argument and is just a popular example of the god-of-the-gaps, however its not "random" or "off the cuff". i hear it all the time on youtube and on forums, and its bills front line argument for the existence of a god when debating an atheist. its definitely gaining popularity, both with people that watch fox news, and with atheists that parody the argument. but i see the point that it is not a unique type of argument in itself.
--Conor147 09:04, 5 March 2011 (CST)
Do you mean about the tides specifically, or the application of the argument from ignorance / god of the gaps? If it's an application, it's a good one for those pages.
--jt 09:53, 5 March 2011 (CST)
yes, its an application. if it becomes more popular and needs to be accessed easier, it can always be moved back. so if someone wants to move it, thats probably the best thing to do. i would do it, but im not really acquainted with the formatting etc.
--Conor147 09:37, 7 March 2011 (CST)
I wasn't aware that this page existed until I read it just now. I agree with the request for deletion. This is about a one-time incident, not a general apologetic, and the tone is a bit more silly than I'm comfortable with. I cannot really imagine somebody coming to Iron Chariots and saying "I just heard Bill O'Reilly's tides argument and need a refutation for it." I propose that anyone who wants to preserve the content here should offload it to another page (Argument from Ignorance was suggested) within a week so I can kill it. --Kazim 14:47, 19 September 2012 (CDT)
I had recreated this topic, since there was a red link. I was not aware it had already existed and been deleted, so my apologies for not having checked Talk. I then created "Tides come in, tides go out" before realizing peasants don't have the ability to delete, so requested this one be deleted. I did all that in order to shorten the title, and because the periods in this titles made it awkward to link. Like I said, I didn't realize it'd already been deleted, so I don't mean to reharsh an old decision, but I would disagree with the points raised. While I agree it's narrow, so too is the "perfect banana". At some point, an argument gains enough notoriety to be a meme, and deserve it's own topic. The same counter-argument applies to people not needing IronChariots to debunk it. It is not a one-time apologetic, since Bill O'Reilly used this multiple times over years. I've never heard anyone else use it, so it may be "single use" as in a single user, but Conor147 has stated that it has been/is used by others. If it is deleted based on being too narrow (again), then "Tides come in, tides go out" needs to also be deleted, and the links leading to it removed. This topic does not have any links to it, as I already redirected them to "Tides come in, tides go out".John Rogers 15:28, 20 November 2013 (CST)
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