Talk:Circular reasoning

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<h3><b>Circular Reasoning = Begging the Question?</b></h3>
 
<h3><b>Circular Reasoning = Begging the Question?</b></h3>
 
Isn't Circular Reasoning the same fallacy as begging the question? Do we need two seperate articles?
 
Isn't Circular Reasoning the same fallacy as begging the question? Do we need two seperate articles?
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: There's a slight difference, though it may not be significant for our purposes. Question begging or Petitio principii is ''implied'' circular reasoning, as opposed to explicit. For example, the statement,''Every word of the Bible is true because it was written/inspired by God'' is question begging - but the question, ''How do you know that it was written by God?'' (other questions are possible) is not explicitly stated. The argument becomes circular reasoning when the answer to that question involves an appeal to the Bible, as in - ''Because the Bible tells us God wrote it.'' If the answer were different, like, ''Because God spoke to me and told me that he wrote the Bible.'' It's not purely circular, though it does still "beg the question" as the core assumptions that God exists and is truthful remain unaddressed...while those are the very things that the original statement is attempting to justify. The distinction is subtle enough that, '''at a minimum''' the two articles should reference each other. [[User:Sans Deity|Sans Deity]] 10:24, 30 October 2006 (CST)

Revision as of 10:24, 30 October 2006

Circular Reasoning = Begging the Question?

Isn't Circular Reasoning the same fallacy as begging the question? Do we need two seperate articles?

There's a slight difference, though it may not be significant for our purposes. Question begging or Petitio principii is implied circular reasoning, as opposed to explicit. For example, the statement,Every word of the Bible is true because it was written/inspired by God is question begging - but the question, How do you know that it was written by God? (other questions are possible) is not explicitly stated. The argument becomes circular reasoning when the answer to that question involves an appeal to the Bible, as in - Because the Bible tells us God wrote it. If the answer were different, like, Because God spoke to me and told me that he wrote the Bible. It's not purely circular, though it does still "beg the question" as the core assumptions that God exists and is truthful remain unaddressed...while those are the very things that the original statement is attempting to justify. The distinction is subtle enough that, at a minimum the two articles should reference each other. Sans Deity 10:24, 30 October 2006 (CST)
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