Jesus lived a sinless life

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[[Jesus Christ]] is said to have lived a [[sin]]less life, something only possible if he were [[divine]].
 
[[Jesus Christ]] is said to have lived a [[sin]]less life, something only possible if he were [[divine]].
  
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The [[gospel]]s contain accounts of Jesus committing sins. At the very least, it is not clear that he never committed any sins.
 
The [[gospel]]s contain accounts of Jesus committing sins. At the very least, it is not clear that he never committed any sins.
  
In {{Bible|Luke 19:29-35}}, Jesus tells his [[disciple]]s to steal a horse, which they do. ({{Bible|Mark 11:1-6}} tells the same story, but notes that the owners let the disciples take the horse once they found out that it was for Jesus.)
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In {{Bible|Luke 19:29-35}}, Jesus tells his [[disciple]]s to steal a donkey, which they do. ({{Bible|Mark 11:1-6}} tells the same story, but notes that the owners let the disciples take the donkey once they found out that it was for Jesus.)
  
 
In {{Bible|Matthew 12:46-50}}, {{Bible|Mark 3:31-35}}, and {{Bible|Luke 8:19-21}}, Jesus is preaching to a crowd, when his mother and brothers come looking for him. He denies them, saying, in effect "my followers are my family now."
 
In {{Bible|Matthew 12:46-50}}, {{Bible|Mark 3:31-35}}, and {{Bible|Luke 8:19-21}}, Jesus is preaching to a crowd, when his mother and brothers come looking for him. He denies them, saying, in effect "my followers are my family now."
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In {{Bible|Matthew 15:4-7}} and {{Bible|Mark.7:9-13}}, Jesus advocates the practice of Old Testament law. Specifically the stoning death of disobedient or disrespectful children.
 
In {{Bible|Matthew 15:4-7}} and {{Bible|Mark.7:9-13}}, Jesus advocates the practice of Old Testament law. Specifically the stoning death of disobedient or disrespectful children.
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There is no evidence of any correlation between sinlessness and divinity. Job was blameless in the sight of God, yet he too wasn't divine. In fact if it were the case then stating that God created man such that he could not be sinless, is a great immoral act on the part of God.
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[[Category:Arguments for the existence of God]]
 
[[Category:Arguments for the existence of God]]
 
[[Category:Christianity]]
 
[[Category:Christianity]]

Latest revision as of 21:02, 12 May 2011

Jesus Christ is said to have lived a sinless life, something only possible if he were divine.

Counterexamples

The gospels contain accounts of Jesus committing sins. At the very least, it is not clear that he never committed any sins.

In Luke 19:29-35 Bible-icon.png, Jesus tells his disciples to steal a donkey, which they do. (Mark 11:1-6 Bible-icon.png tells the same story, but notes that the owners let the disciples take the donkey once they found out that it was for Jesus.)

In Matthew 12:46-50 Bible-icon.png, Mark 3:31-35 Bible-icon.png, and Luke 8:19-21 Bible-icon.png, Jesus is preaching to a crowd, when his mother and brothers come looking for him. He denies them, saying, in effect "my followers are my family now."

In Luke 16:1-9 Bible-icon.png, Jesus tells a parable about a manager who encourages his clients to pay his employer less than they owe. He is commended for acting "wisely".

In Luke 12:47-48 Bible-icon.png, Jesus advocates the beating of slaves.

In Matthew 15:4-7 Bible-icon.png and Mark.7:9-13 Bible-icon.png, Jesus advocates the practice of Old Testament law. Specifically the stoning death of disobedient or disrespectful children.


There is no evidence of any correlation between sinlessness and divinity. Job was blameless in the sight of God, yet he too wasn't divine. In fact if it were the case then stating that God created man such that he could not be sinless, is a great immoral act on the part of God.

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