Jesus died for your sins

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(Counter Apologetics)
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This statement is based upon the Christian [[doctrine]] that Jesus was sent to [[Earth]] by [[God]] to take away the [[sins]] of the world, and was cruxified, died, resurrected three days later and rose to heaven to be with God, his father (who is also himself).
 
This statement is based upon the Christian [[doctrine]] that Jesus was sent to [[Earth]] by [[God]] to take away the [[sins]] of the world, and was cruxified, died, resurrected three days later and rose to heaven to be with God, his father (who is also himself).
  
===Counter Apologetics===
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===Counter-Apologetics===
  
"God sacrificed himself to himself to save people from an eternal punishment for the 'sins' of people who didn't know any better, but which he knew were going to happen ([[omniscience]]) because he engineered the circumstances in which they would commit sin?"
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* The way the story of [[Adam and Eve]] is written, God apparently created people knowing that they were likely to sin, and then engineered the circumstances in which they would commit sin.  Is it reasonable to blame people for acting in the way that God created them?
 
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* Why a sacrifice at all? Surely if an [[omnipotent]] being did not want to eternally punish people, he would simply not eternally punish them.  How exactly does God sacrificing himself to himself change the situation?
"Sacrifice?  Jesus was cruxified by people who didn't agree with his contemporary blaphemy, knowing that he was a god, was taken off the cross just a few hours later, supposedly died, rose from the dead and is now in heaven? It doesn't sound like much of a sacrifice to me!"
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* For an eternal being, dying for three days is not much of a sacrifice. Jesus was cruxified by people who didn't agree with his contemporary blaphemy, knowing that he was a god, was taken off the cross just a few hours later, supposedly died, rose from the dead and is now in heaven. Plenty of people have suffered worse tortures throughout history, and have not gotten to become God in the bargain.  Perhaps if Jesus had truly died and was suffering in [[hell]] right now and for the rest of eternity, that would be a ''real'' sacrifice for us.
 
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"A better sacrifice would have been if Jesus had died and was suffering in [[hell]] right now and for the rest of eternity, for us.  That would be a ''real'' sacrifice."
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Revision as of 07:10, 15 October 2006


"Jesus died for your sins" (or "Jesus paid for your sins") is a common appeal to emotion used by Christians when attempting to offer a reason to why one should accept Jesus Christ as their saviour.

This statement is based upon the Christian doctrine that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to take away the sins of the world, and was cruxified, died, resurrected three days later and rose to heaven to be with God, his father (who is also himself).

Counter-Apologetics

  • The way the story of Adam and Eve is written, God apparently created people knowing that they were likely to sin, and then engineered the circumstances in which they would commit sin. Is it reasonable to blame people for acting in the way that God created them?
  • Why a sacrifice at all? Surely if an omnipotent being did not want to eternally punish people, he would simply not eternally punish them. How exactly does God sacrificing himself to himself change the situation?
  • For an eternal being, dying for three days is not much of a sacrifice. Jesus was cruxified by people who didn't agree with his contemporary blaphemy, knowing that he was a god, was taken off the cross just a few hours later, supposedly died, rose from the dead and is now in heaven. Plenty of people have suffered worse tortures throughout history, and have not gotten to become God in the bargain. Perhaps if Jesus had truly died and was suffering in hell right now and for the rest of eternity, that would be a real sacrifice for us.
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