Gene Cook

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(cat:Xn apol)
(wikif.)
Line 1: Line 1:
Pastor Gene Cook, Jr. is a [[Southern Baptist]] pastor who hosts the radio program The Narrow Mind, which focuses on [[Calvinist]] brand apologetics.  The show used to devote a significant amount of time to atheist issues and guests but now limits atheist callers and topics to "Atheistic Wednesday".  Gene has stated the reason he decided to devote less time on the show to atheists is that no atheist has yet been able to understand his "teleological argument".
+
'''Gene Cook, Jr.''' is a [[Southern Baptist]] [[pastor]] who hosts the radio program The Narrow Mind, which focuses on [[Calvinist]]-brand [[apologetics]].  The show used to devote a significant amount of time to [[atheist]] issues and guests but now limits atheist callers and topics to "Atheistic Wednesday".  Gene has stated the reason he decided to devote less time on the show to atheists is that no atheist has yet been able to understand his "teleological argument".
  
 +
== Cook's teleological argument ==
  
== Teleological Argument ==
+
This is the argument by which Cook attempts to either undercut the basis for a [[scientific]] worldview, or to make the claim that there is an equal evidentiary basis for [[Christian]] [[belief]] and the scientific worldview.
This is the argument by which pastor Gene attempts to either undercut the basis for a scientific worldview or to make the claim that there is an equal evidentiary basis for Christian belief and a scientific worldview.
+
Gene says that he makes a [[presupposition]] that the [[Bible]] is the inerrant word of [[God]], and that that is the basis for all of his other beliefs.  He claims, moreover, that without a similar presupposition, an atheist cannot justify belief in the laws of [[logic]] or [[science]].
Gene says that he makes a [[presupposition]] that the [[Bible]] is the inerrant word of [[God]], and that that is the basis for all of his other beliefs.  He claims, moreover, that without a similar presupposition, an atheist cannot justify belief in the laws of logic or science.
+
  
Gene routinely employs variations on the Natural-law Argument by suggesting that the laws of logic, for instance, need to be accounted for, and that the only way to do this is to infer a creator.
+
Cook routinely employs variations on the [[natural-law argument]] by suggesting that the laws of logic, for instance, need to be accounted for, and that the only way to do this is to infer a creator.
  
Gene also regularly falls into the logical fallacy of [[equivocation]], in that he refuses to accept any but his own strain of belief as Christianity.  This is not uncommon among conservative Christians.
+
He also regularly falls into the [[logical fallacy]] of [[equivocation]], in that he refuses to accept any but his own strain of belief as "Christianity".  This is not uncommon among conservative Christians.
  
 
[[Category:Christian apologists]]
 
[[Category:Christian apologists]]

Revision as of 12:14, 31 January 2007

Gene Cook, Jr. is a Southern Baptist pastor who hosts the radio program The Narrow Mind, which focuses on Calvinist-brand apologetics. The show used to devote a significant amount of time to atheist issues and guests but now limits atheist callers and topics to "Atheistic Wednesday". Gene has stated the reason he decided to devote less time on the show to atheists is that no atheist has yet been able to understand his "teleological argument".

Cook's teleological argument

This is the argument by which Cook attempts to either undercut the basis for a scientific worldview, or to make the claim that there is an equal evidentiary basis for Christian belief and the scientific worldview. Gene says that he makes a presupposition that the Bible is the inerrant word of God, and that that is the basis for all of his other beliefs. He claims, moreover, that without a similar presupposition, an atheist cannot justify belief in the laws of logic or science.

Cook routinely employs variations on the natural-law argument by suggesting that the laws of logic, for instance, need to be accounted for, and that the only way to do this is to infer a creator.

He also regularly falls into the logical fallacy of equivocation, in that he refuses to accept any but his own strain of belief as "Christianity". This is not uncommon among conservative Christians.

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
wiki navigation
IronChariots.Org
Toolbox