Flying Spaghetti Monster

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A typical depiction of the Flying Spaghetti Monster
FSM emblem
"What Would the Flying Spaghetti Monster Do?" — a parody of "What Would Jesus Do?" (WWJD?)
"I want to believe", a reference to a poster in the TV series The X-Files

The Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM) is a deity invented by Bobby Henderson as a parody of Intelligent design, similar to the Invisible pink unicorn. The FSM first came to public notice when Henderson wrote a letter to the Kansas School Board, which was considering adding Intelligent Design to the curriculum; Henderson argued for including the FSM as well, echoing many of the arguments used by Intelligent Design advocates.

Although the FSM is absurd, and there is no evidence for its existence, the same can be said of God and of the "designer" in Intelligent Design. Thus, Henderson argues, if a school district chooses to teach ID in the classroom, it ought to teach the Flying Spaghetti Monster as well, so that students can hear all viewpoints and make up their own minds.

Followers of the Flying Spaghetti Monster are known as "Pastafarians" (a term modeled after "Rastafarians").

The deity

The Flying Spaghetti Monster is depicted as a knot of spaghetti, flanked by two meatballs, with eyes on stalks. Such a depiction is merely a guess, as the FSM is invisible to all known forms of scientific detection.

The FSM is said to be capable of altering measurement results to make the world appear older or otherwise different from the way it really is. Thus, a scientist may carbon-date an artifact as being 10,000 years old, but:

[W]hat our scientist does not realize is that every time he makes a measurement, the Flying Spaghetti Monster is there changing the results with His Noodly Appendage.

This illustrates the problem of trying to do science without methodological naturalism.

FSM lore includes a creation myth, and a graph showing an inverse relationship between global temperature and the number of pirates in the world, which serves to illustrate the flaw in assuming that just because figures correlate they must be causally connected.

In 2006, Henderson published the first book about the FSM, The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

External link

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