Epistemology

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'''[[Epistemology]]''' is the philosophical study of [[knowledge]], including its nature, origins, and limitations. To this end, it attempts to define and distinguish the notions of ''knowledge'', ''[[truth]]'' and ''[[belief]]''.
 
'''[[Epistemology]]''' is the philosophical study of [[knowledge]], including its nature, origins, and limitations. To this end, it attempts to define and distinguish the notions of ''knowledge'', ''[[truth]]'' and ''[[belief]]''.
  
Epistemology as it pertains to religious belief deals mainly with the standards or criterion for justified religious belief. Key concepts include justification and warrant. Arguments for the justification of religious belief are involve either internalism or externalism. The internalist criterion for justification is that we must be have cognitive access to the grounds of any belief we hold. Externalism on the other hand does not require this access, but requires that one simply have some grounds for one's beliefs.  
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Epistemology as it pertains to religious belief deals mainly with the standards or criteria for justified religious belief. Key concepts include justification and warrant. Arguments for the justification of religious belief involve either internalism or externalism. The internalist criterion for justification states that we must have cognitive access to the grounds of any belief we hold. Externalism, on the other hand, does not require this access, but requires that one simply have some grounds for one's beliefs.  
  
 
{{Philosophy}}
 
{{Philosophy}}

Latest revision as of 18:02, 6 May 2011

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Epistemology is the philosophical study of knowledge, including its nature, origins, and limitations. To this end, it attempts to define and distinguish the notions of knowledge, truth and belief.

Epistemology as it pertains to religious belief deals mainly with the standards or criteria for justified religious belief. Key concepts include justification and warrant. Arguments for the justification of religious belief involve either internalism or externalism. The internalist criterion for justification states that we must have cognitive access to the grounds of any belief we hold. Externalism, on the other hand, does not require this access, but requires that one simply have some grounds for one's beliefs.


v · d Philosophy
History of philosophy   Ancient Greek philosophy · Rationalism · Post Modernism · Utilitarianism · Existentialism · Objectivism · Metaphysics of quality · Secular humanism · Transhumanism
Existence   Reality · Mind-body dualism · Purpose of existence · Value of life · Solipsism
Morality and ethics   Ethics of Aristotle · Relative morality · Objective morality · Golden rule
Epistemology   Belief · Truth · Justification · A priori · A posteriori · Observation · Analysis · Synthesis · Absolute certainty · Information theory · Plato's Apology of Socrates
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