Common descent

From Iron Chariots Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikipedia-logo-en.png
For more information, see the Wikipedia article:

The idea of common descent — that some individuals are related to each other by way of a common ancestor — is uncontroversial when applied to individuals of the same species. That it is true of individuals of different species was suggested by Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis in the 1740s and was adopted as a central concept of evolution.

The idea of universal common descent — that all species of life on Earth developed, or descended, from a common ancestor — is now almost universally accepted by the scientific community. [1] It is notably rejected by creationists, especially young-Earth creationists, who suggest that groups of species were created separately by God and the groups could not interbreed.

Common descent from Adam and Eve

Talkorigins-logo.jpg
For more information, see the TalkOrigins Archive article:
"[...] genetics confirms we are all one race—consistent with humans being descendants of Adam and Eve.[2]"

While genetics indicates that all humans are related, we are also related to all other species and the common ancestor of all life is far older and much more simple than a human.

References

  1. Douglas Theobald, 29+ Evidences for Macroevolution, The Scientific Case for Common Descent, 1999-2012
  2. [1]
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
wiki navigation
IronChariots.Org
Toolbox