Authoritarianism

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'''Authoritarianism''' is a form of [[social control]] characterized by strict obedience to the [[authority]] of a state, organization, or individual; the central authority figure often maintains and enforces control through the use of oppressive measures.[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Authoritarianism]
 
'''Authoritarianism''' is a form of [[social control]] characterized by strict obedience to the [[authority]] of a state, organization, or individual; the central authority figure often maintains and enforces control through the use of oppressive measures.[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Authoritarianism]
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Common examples of authoritarianism include:
 
Common examples of authoritarianism include:
 
# Authoritarian family structure: children submissive to their parents, with the wife submissive to her husband (or sometimes the husband submissive to his wife)
 
# Authoritarian family structure: children submissive to their parents, with the wife submissive to her husband (or sometimes the husband submissive to his wife)
#* Note that the former arrangement (wife submissive to husband) is commonly what is meant when a family structure is described as "traditional". This is family structure most often
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#* Note that the former arrangement (wife submissive to husband) is commonly what is meant when a family structure is described as "traditional".
 
# Authoritarian state (or form of government): the people submissive to their leaders, with lower-level officials submissive to a strong central committee or individual.
 
# Authoritarian state (or form of government): the people submissive to their leaders, with lower-level officials submissive to a strong central committee or individual.
  
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* ''Right-wing'' followers advocate submission to traditional authorities, such as [[church]]es or other [[religious]] institutions, and the [[government]].
 
* ''Right-wing'' followers advocate submission to traditional authorities, such as [[church]]es or other [[religious]] institutions, and the [[government]].
 
* ''Left-wing'' followers are submissive to a radical leaders who seek to overthrow the status quo.
 
* ''Left-wing'' followers are submissive to a radical leaders who seek to overthrow the status quo.
 
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Revision as of 16:33, 23 July 2010

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For more information, see the Wikipedia article:

Authoritarianism is a form of social control characterized by strict obedience to the authority of a state, organization, or individual; the central authority figure often maintains and enforces control through the use of oppressive measures.[1]

Common examples of authoritarianism include:

  1. Authoritarian family structure: children submissive to their parents, with the wife submissive to her husband (or sometimes the husband submissive to his wife)
    • Note that the former arrangement (wife submissive to husband) is commonly what is meant when a family structure is described as "traditional".
  2. Authoritarian state (or form of government): the people submissive to their leaders, with lower-level officials submissive to a strong central committee or individual.

A related concept is the so-called authoritarian personality (or character), a set of characteristics purported to predict antidemocratic or fascist leanings.

There are two types of authoritarian followers, right-wing and left-wing:

  • Right-wing followers advocate submission to traditional authorities, such as churches or other religious institutions, and the government.
  • Left-wing followers are submissive to a radical leaders who seek to overthrow the status quo.
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