Argument from fallacy

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An Argument from Fallacy is an argument that has one or more fundamentally wrong statements or points.
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An '''argument from fallacy''' is a formal fallacy which occurs when analyzing an argument and assuming that, because the argument contains a [[logical fallacy]] the conclusion of that argument must be false. It is also commonly referred to as the '''fallacist's fallacy'''.
An example of one of these arguments would be "If we came from monkeys, why do monkeys still exist?"
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==Form==
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The form of the argument from fallacy requires a meta-argument, or an argument about the claims of an argument.
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:There is an argument '''A''' which has a conclusion '''C'''.
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:That argument '''A''' contains a logical fallacy.
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:[[Non sequitur|Therefore]], '''C''' is false.
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The issue here is that while the presence of a fallacy is sufficient to render argument '''A''' invalid, it does not make '''C''' false. Rather, the truth value of '''C''' is unknown, because there is no valid argument as to whether '''C''' is true or false.
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===Example===
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* Bob asserts that [[evolution]] is true.
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* Bob says it's true because [[Charles Darwin]] said so - which is an [[argument from authority]], and thus a fallacy.
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* Therefore, evolution is false.
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{{DEFAULTSORT:Fallacy, Argument from}}
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[[Category:Logical fallacies]]

Revision as of 12:59, 12 March 2012

An argument from fallacy is a formal fallacy which occurs when analyzing an argument and assuming that, because the argument contains a logical fallacy the conclusion of that argument must be false. It is also commonly referred to as the fallacist's fallacy.

Form

The form of the argument from fallacy requires a meta-argument, or an argument about the claims of an argument.

There is an argument A which has a conclusion C.
That argument A contains a logical fallacy.
Therefore, C is false.

The issue here is that while the presence of a fallacy is sufficient to render argument A invalid, it does not make C false. Rather, the truth value of C is unknown, because there is no valid argument as to whether C is true or false.

Example

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