Appeal to emotion

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(Added cartoon as illustration.)
(rewrite Hitler example/response)
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*"[[Hitler]] was an [[evil]] [[atheist]]; you don't want to be a Nazi, do you?"
 
*"[[Hitler]] was an [[evil]] [[atheist]]; you don't want to be a Nazi, do you?"
  
The first objection to the statement is whether or not Hitler was an atheist, which tends to be an [[argument from ignorance]], due to the fact that Hitler was a devout [[catholic]]. The second issue with the statement is that it makes a link between atheism and Nazism via an [[Enthymeme|enthymeme]].
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The [[premise]] of this argument is faulty; Hitler was actually a devout [[Catholic]]. Even if the premise were granted, however, the attempted link between atheism and Nazism relies on an [[Enthymeme|enthymeme]] (missing premise).
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[[Category:Logical fallacies]]
 
[[Category:Logical fallacies]]

Revision as of 17:15, 20 November 2008

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal cartoon illustrating the fallacy of appeal to emotion.

An appeal to emotion is an argument tactic which attempts to circumvent rational thought in the hopes of supporting a conclusion with an emotional response.

Example

  • "Aren't you afraid to go to hell when you die?"

The above statement appeals to the listener's emotion of fear, but begs the question by assuming that hell exists in the first place.

The premise of this argument is faulty; Hitler was actually a devout Catholic. Even if the premise were granted, however, the attempted link between atheism and Nazism relies on an enthymeme (missing premise).

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