Accident fallacy

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The '''Accident fallacy''', or '''a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid''', is when generalizations are applied to circumstances when they are otherwise flukes or exceptions. The broader the generalization, the weaker it tends to be, and is more prone to this type of fallacy.
 
The '''Accident fallacy''', or '''a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid''', is when generalizations are applied to circumstances when they are otherwise flukes or exceptions. The broader the generalization, the weaker it tends to be, and is more prone to this type of fallacy.
  

Revision as of 22:05, 24 February 2011


The Accident fallacy, or a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid, is when generalizations are applied to circumstances when they are otherwise flukes or exceptions. The broader the generalization, the weaker it tends to be, and is more prone to this type of fallacy.

Examples

  • Example 1
  1. Cutting people is criminal
  2. Surgeons cut people
  3. Surgeons are criminals
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